technology

The Navy is showing how today’s technologies will be used tomorrow

March 13, 2014
1913 Views

oculus rift The Navy is showing how todays technologies will be used tomorrow

Envisioning tomorrow’s technologies

Gizmodo spent some time at the U.S. Navy’s Institute for Creative Technologies and sported the Oculus Rift (virtual reality head-mounted display) in conjunction with other augmented reality technologies that exist today.

Combined, they form what the Navy believes could not only be the future of the military and warfare, but it is easy to see how these tools can transform the business world and work environment.

bar The Navy is showing how todays technologies will be used tomorrow
The Oculus Rift was designed for gaming, but has quickly been picked up by technologist and dreamers alike, and reimagined for endless uses in the near future.



Advertise at AG

Check out how the Navy envisions using this and other tools:

How will these technologies change the business world?

Virtual technologies have existed for quite some time, but not only has the general public finally understood that they exist and have implications beyond gaming, the public has seen wearable technologies go mainstream in just the last few years. That core understanding has made the technologies possible, because people want them for recreational use, paving the way for professional use.

Imagine a factory with a virtual station as depicted above. Think of how tech support call centers could be augmented by technologies of this nature. Groups of people can be streamlined, but more importantly, niche expertise can flourish in a way it never has before.

Like the video stated above, there are implications much deeper than gaming, and the business world and military world stand to benefit from the extension of these technologies beyond the exact specifications they were invented for.

Marti Trewe reports on business and technology news, chasing his passion for helping entrepreneurs and small businesses to stay well informed in the fast paced 140-character world. Marti rarely sleeps and thrives on reader news tips, especially about startups and big moves in leadership.