refollow

Refollow: Twitter relationship manager tool

August 27, 2013
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refollow Refollow: Twitter relationship manager tool

Refollow: build your Twitter account

Refollow’s tool can be broken down in to four parts: load, filter, select, and act. You log in with your Twitter account information, and it automatically loads your followers and people you follow. Next, you can filter your followers with a ton of options.

Once you find a follower, you can select them by page, or by clicking on their avatar. And once they are selected, it is time to act. You can follow/unfollow, lock, or block anyone you want on Refollow. This helps you find and follow people who share your interests, who are then more likely to follow you in return and then share your tweets with people with follow them, and so forth. Growing your followers is quick and easy with Refollow.

Using the unfollow feature, you can quickly go back and unfollow anyone who does not follow you back if you are focused on gaining followers quickly. You can also “lock” favorite users so they will always appear in your list, without fear of deleting them.

Not only does this help you build your Twitter follower base, but it also, allows you to search for a specific user without having to search through an endless feed of tweets. If you know the person you are looking for has tweeted in the last two days and has a picture on their profile, you can use the filters to narrow down your followers and find the person you are looking for immediately.



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The following filters are available:

·Are following me ·I’m not following ·Are not following me
·I’ve never followed ·I’m following ·Have never mentioned ____.
·Tweeted in the past (number of days) ·No tweets in the last (number of days)
·Has/does not have a picture in their profile ·I have/have not previously followed
·I have/have not locked ·I began following more/less than (number of days) ago
·Primarily speaks (select language) · Have more than (select number) friends
·Have/ have never mentioned (enter text) in their (select from dropdown)
·Have less than (select number) friends ·Have more/less than (select number) followers
·Have more/less than (select number) tweets
·Have more/less than (select number) daily tweets

Refollow goes pro

When I tried out the tool with my own Twitter account, I received the following message:

“We’ve managed to keep many of our features free such as loading friends and followers, filtering, sorting, tagging, and commenting. But unfortunately Twitter has recently placed restrictions on the number of ‘follow’ and ‘unfollow’ requests we can issue from each of our servers. This means it costs us more than we can justify giving away for free, so we are passing that cost on to you.”

And there are not as many filtering options, but this may vary with a paid account. We could not find a way to verify this on their blog.

But to get you started, they give you one hundred free follows/unfollows so you can play around with the tool and see if Refollow is right for you. Once you are ready, there are subscription plans, according to the Refollow blog:

  • Free: One hundred follows/unfollows
  • Pro: $20.00/mo. – Unlimited use for 1 account (Note: subject to all limitations and policies imposed by Twitter for your account)
  • Business: $50.00/mo. – Unlimited use for 5 accounts
  • Enterprise: $150.00/mo. – Unlimited use for 20 accounts
  • Non-profit: Free – Unlimited use for 1 account (requires verification of 503C Form)

With the new changes to pricing and options, businesses will need to weigh the cost against the benefits because while it does offer some very useful features, the pricing could be hard for small businesses to manage but could save medium to large businesses substantial time, offsetting costs.

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Jennifer Walpole is a staff writer for AGBeat and holds a Masters degree in English from the University of Oklahoma. She is a science fiction fanatic and enjoys writing way more than she should. She dreams of being a screenwriter and seeing her work on the big screen in Hollywood one day.



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