social media

What is no longer working in social media: 2014 edition

April 21, 2014
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social media What is no longer working in social media: 2014 edition

What’s new in social media, and what is broken

At least quarterly, it’s a good idea to find out what’s no longer working in different parts of digital marketing, particularly in fast-moving areas like social. This week, we’ll talk about what’s no longer working in social media, then we’ll move on to what’s new. And in our next series, we’ll also talk about search.

Before we proceed though, it is worth mentioning that participating in social media without a plan is asking for trouble. Really think about why you’re using social and what you hope to achieve. More visibility? An increase in website visitors? What are they supposed to do when they get to your website? Is your blog connected to your lead capture system?

bar What is no longer working in social media: 2014 edition
Also think about the role of social in your overall online strategy, whether it’s part of branding, marketing or customer service.



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1. Blogging

It’s often forgotten that blogs were among the first social media tools – the best we’d had available since the online bulletin board or forum.
The ramp-up to slow-down theory of blogging is no longer working. You can’t blog daily for six weeks, then slow down and blog when you “have time” and expect the same results.

Studies are now showing that ramping up to posting even every other day increases sales. So wake up that dead blog.You can start by asking people who have subscribed via email what they’d like to learn about.

Try doing more shorter, pithier posts, then one in-depth post a week.

2. Twitter

There was a time you could get away with broadcasting links into the general noise of Twitter, and be noticed due to the curiosity factor of Twitter’s firehose, and the fact that Google would pick up your tweets in real time, and even show them in real time on trending searches.

Now, not only has the Twitter firehose been hidden for years now, but Google’s relationship with Twitter has changed – no more real time tweets on hot searches.

Besides, Twitter was never meant to be a broadcast medium and most people ignore much of what is on their incoming streams, or whittle them down to a manageable level, full of only the people they most want to interact with frequently. Instead of trying to manage my full incoming Twitter stream,

I look at my Twitter lists, hashtags, and people who I’ve set to mobile notifications first.

Most people on Twitter now have a system similar to this or a custom timeline – being followed is no longer enough to get noticed.

You must provide value, and shouting “LOOK AT ME AND MY STUFF” isn’t doing it anymore.

Pick some non-competing colleagues (or even the competition if you’re confident) and share their most helpful content 6 to 8 times for every time you talk about yourself. I personally find that I get a lot more attention when I’m ready to talk about myself if I share my community with others.

Screen some Twitter chats related to your topic if you have trouble finding out who these people are.

3. Facebook

Oh #facepalm. Where do I begin with what doesn’t work on Facebook?

I’m tempted to say “everything”. For Pages, reach is down, because apparently Facebook differs from Twitter in that it either doesn’t see the value, or doesn’t have the capability, to show you everything you or your connections are subscribed to in the the public stream.

You’ve got to pay to play and even that can give you dismal results.

Ever since Facebook began to take away some of pages killer features, I haven’t been the fan I once was. It used to be easy to get prospects to opt-in to be contacted outside Facebook, to create posts natively using the Notes app, and many other things personal profiles have been able to do, or still can.

If you’re using your personal profile for personal interaction, it’s best to keep it that way. But if you’ve been using your profile’s ability to make certain information visible or hidden to certain groups via the refreshed Lists feature, that may be your best bet for visibility of informational posts that aren’t commercially heavy.

4. LinkedIn

LinkedIn used to have a kick-ass section called LinkedIn Answers. You could get a crazy amount of visibility by logging in once a quarter and answering questions until you were one of the top three in a sub-niche. I used to get very high quality client leads this way.

Now LinkedIn is letting more people into its Influencers program. Many don’t see the appeal to writing to an audience they already have. However, if you promote your LinkedIn posts as you would any other content marketing item or guest post, you will find that your audience expands outside the contacts you already have.

Test this out by applying to their program – if you’re accepted, test with a reworked blog post if you don’t have any new content on hand.

5. YouTube

Trying to grow your YouTube audience without interaction is much harder than it used to be. In years past, you could get away with just optimizing for search and exposing your videos to your own subscribers or your blog audience.

Now, the action on your page is part of the criteria for getting ranked, according to my favorite source on video SEO, ReelSEO (get it? Why can’t I think of things like that?)

A dead channel is an ignored channel. Get out there and find the active users in your space. Delight them and lure them to your channel.

6. Google+

So here’s a weird one for you – the main thing not working for Google+ is ignoring it.

If you’ve hated Google+ for years, you had good reason. With lots of abandoned profiles and few of the features that now exist, 2011 was way too early to speculate about its potential.

However adoption among more regular people, business owners, bloggers, and even Android users is making Google+ the place to be, not to mention the ability to leverage additional spots in Google’s universal search rankings, or the personalized rankings of people you’re connected to via the site.

If for no other reason than to get your OWN blog more personalized rankings by being connected to more people than your nearest competition, Google+ is a must if Google search is part of your marketing strategy.

You may hate it, but even though we may hate accounting, we still make sure it gets done. Build out your profile and invest just 5 minutes a day making new connections on Google+ – if you do it right, it’ll be worth your while.

The takeaway

Sometimes it feels like our social media efforts are failing. And sometimes, this is actually true. The key question to ask isn’t IF there is failing but WHAT is failing. Before you give up, make sure the point of failure isn’t your strategy or technique.

Tinu Abayomi-Paul is the CEO of Leveraged Promotion and a member of Network Solutions Social web Advisory Board. Her website promotion company specializes in reputation management, and engineering demand generation system for businesses, integrating search, expertise marketing and social media.


  • http://Plus.AskTheRECoach.com/ Eric “The Coach” Bryant

    Outstanding Article Young Lady! =)

    This is a subject that had to be talked about. So many “Newbies” are just now making their way into Social Media, and Internet Marketing, and they are landing on the very places that you have now show (And rightfully so) to be “Obsolete” and “Out of Touch” .. it’s scary! They will be stuck learning these outlets, and still be at the “Starting Line” … It’s so sad =(

    There are so many “Guru’s” out there, taking advantage of the ignorance, and teaching these things as if they are important! It’s “Snake Oil” sales now, and they are just taking money out of Small Business Owners and Entrepreneurs pockets, with little or no value.

    Here is my take on your 5 subjects …

    1)
    Blogging: “Try doing more shorter, pithier
    posts, then one in-depth post a week.” – Brilliant!

    2)
    Twitter: “You must provide value, and shouting
    “LOOK AT ME AND MY STUFF” isn’t doing it anymore” – Bingo!

    3)
    Facebook
    – IMHO … Dead! With one “Notable”
    exception … Private Community based Pages. They are “Knocking it Out of the Park!”
    Administrating a great Hyper-Local Neighborhood Page is garnering outstanding
    and quality relationships with potential clients!

    4)
    YouTube: Totally Disagree! This is the Future of
    Sharing your message, and connecting with potential customers here is at an
    All-Time High!

    5)
    Google+: Agreed … It is still a “Necessary Evil”
    to be a part of, and gaining (Ever so slowly) traction, and because it is
    Google, it has a high probability of long term success so you gotta stick with it!

    Really Enjoyed, Best of Luck to All Who Attack Online Marketing =)

    Coach

    • http://freetraffictip.com Tinu

      Thank you! Very in-depth commentary, you should write it up as an article. :)

      I’m not the guru type. Some people (still! gr) call me that, but I believe in sharing tested knowledge. I hold some advanced techniques back, but I’d rather prove my worth 100 times before someone hires me and have an enthusiastic client. In this day, doing otherwise is leaving money on the table.

      I think we’re saying the same thing about YouTube though. I think it’s at an all time high too – I just think if you ignore your channel, it’s at 1% of its potential.

      • http://Plus.AskTheRECoach.com/ Eric “The Coach” Bryant

        RE: YouTube … Now that I agree with! =)

        Coach

  • http://www.changeworksmedia.com/ Trish Jones

    This is an excellent article, Tinu. With the exception of LinkedIn which I can’t comment on because I rarely use it, your points about the other social networks and blogging are spot on. And to add my two cents to Google+, guys, come and join the community, it’s good, good, good!

    • http://freetraffictip.com Tinu

      Hi Trish! How have you been? I’m not the biggest fan of LinkedIn, but even my sporadic use has paid off. I’ve been putting off adding an article in because I would rather that it’s unique content. But I’m softening after seeing peers re-publish popular content there.

      Hope to see you around here more, and soon!

      • http://www.changeworksmedia.com/ Trish Jones

        I am very well thanks Tinu. I’ve been hearing from people who have had some good results via LinkedIn and so now you’ve mentioned it, it might be worth getting more active. Thanks for that heads-up. And yes, looking forward to reading more from you!

  • http://erikaawakening.com/ Erika Awakening

    Love this article… Things are definitely shifting. I am no longer finding Facebook to be a very useful tool like it once was. And this is not only the changes in FB policies. It’s also because way too many people are now using FB as the equivalent of cable television. Mind-numbing, without taking the action they need to take to improve their lives. I will definitely be exploring other avenues, as I have now deactivated my main FB account.

    • http://freetraffictip.com Tinu

      Hi Erika, Always interested in hearing about deactivation stories, because I always wonder if you maintain online connections elsewhere or just forego things like pictures of nieces and nephew that are far away.

      Since many immediate family members are overseas, its much cheaper from their side to follow my postings or pictures, or to share pictures online than by text or email. I doubt I’ll deactivate until family starts to migrate to whatever the next Facebook is.

      • http://erikaawakening.com/ Erika Awakening

        Hi Tinu, it helps that I don’t really believe in having a personal life lol (that’s too long a conversation for here). I don’t use Facebook to connect that way. I use it to reach people with my message and it was no longer feeling like an effective way to do that. My method has far outpaced the development of my “community” there and conversations were getting too frustrating. Not sure if that helps understand it …

        • http://freetraffictip.com Tinu

          Oh I definitely understand the impulse. These are my own personal reasons for not jumping ship.

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